SWGDE

Scientific Working Group on Digital Evidence

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The Scientific Working Group on Digital Evidence (SWGDE) brings together organizations actively engaged in the field of digital and multimedia evidence to foster communication and cooperation as well as to ensure quality and consistency within the forensic community.

If these are your interests, we would like to welcome you to our site. We hope you will find the information found within to be of benefit.

Read more in About Us

Mary Horvath, Chair
Federal Bureau of Investigation

James Darnell, Vice Chair
US Secret Service

Announcements

There are no announcements at this time
Membership
SWGDE is actively encouraging new membership! Learn about attending a meeting as a guest or applying for membership.
Newest Publications
SWGDE's most recent published documents are:
  • SWGDE Best Practices for Digital Forensic Video Analysis
  • SWGDE Establishing Confidence in Digital Forensic Results by Error Mitigation Analysis
  • SWGDE Minimum Requirements for Testing Tools used in Digital and Multimedia Forensics
Provide Feedback
SWGDE seeks feedback from the DME community on our drafts for public comment:
  • SWGDE Technical Overview for Forensic Image Comparison
  • SWGDE Position on the Use of MD5 and SHA1 Hash Algorithms in Digital and Multimedia Forensics
  • SWGDE General Photography Guidelines for the Documentation of Evidence Items in the Laboratory

Myth of the Day

When images are digitally enhanced, they must be reproducible, and these reproductions must be ‘bit-for-bit’ copies of each other.
Category: All DME Myths
Digitally-enhanced images must be reproducible; however, when images are enhanced the bit values change. Two persons using the same techniques, producing images visually indistinguishable from each other, will get different bit values. This is an expected and normal occurrence that should not affect the admissibility of the image. Reproducibility is judged by obtaining visually comparable results, not identical bit values.
See Myths